In Defense of Daydreaming

People often ask writers where they get their ideas, a question I’ve always found interesting. What do you mean where do I get them? I don’t get them anywhere. They come to me. This isn’t to say they’re all generated by my mind from thin air. They’re a mix of day-to-day observations, knowledge gained from researching an interesting subject, and my own internal angst about something. But it usually starts with daydreaming.

As I was thinking about this post my mind began to wander. I went from daydreaming about being a bestselling author, to thinking about being Ernest Hemingway, to his quote about writing the truest sentence you know, to writing my own truest sentence in my head, to giving that sentence to a character. And now I have a book idea about a villainous puppeteer.

I wasn’t purposely looking for a new novel idea. It just came to me as I let my mind wander.

daydreaming meme

And it’s not just about coming up with book ideas. Here are some of my recent daydreams:

-Create YouTube channel with as many followers as John Green. Then sell as many books as him. Then be famous.

-Not only make a book trailer for my book, but also create a music video where I dance with the very famous actors who will star in the movie based on my book. (Don’t worry. I’ve got the choreography all figured out.)

-Open my own animal sanctuary and have hundreds of cats, squirrels, or whatever animal crawls/flies/swims its way into my heart.

-Learn to sail and then sail around the world. I’ve already envisioned what our boat will look like and what I’ll be wearing.

-Make dioramas of Chapstick tubes dressed to look like characters from movies and TV shows. This project is thoroughly sketched out, complete with caption ideas and props. I’ve got Jaws, The Breakfast Club, Poltergeist, Dexter, The Vampire Diaries… It’s going to be epic.

In some cases, I’ve taken the daydreaming a step further to actual planning and goal setting. But if we’re being honest, it’s likely I won’t actually accomplish all of these things.

So I think the next logical question is:

Well, if I’m not actually going to do all of these things, is it a waste of time to daydream about them?

I say no.

I believe daydreams help to shape my present and future. Maybe they provide me with tools I’ll use in the future, allow me to practice possible scenarios in my head, and identify possible tactics and solutions. They help me define my goals and figure out who I want to be in the future.

And for every handful of daydreams, I know I will make some of them come true:

-One day, I woke up and decided to write a book. I daydreamed about it, came up with a plan, and I actually did it.

-Logan realized that he loved woodworking. He daydreamed about it. I daydreamed about it for him (because I’m really good at it), and we decided he should quit his job and we should move to Maine so he could attend furniture-making school. We daydreamed, we planned, we moved. And here we are.

maine freeway sign

It was much warmer when we arrived…

And I know that while some daydreams won’t come true, they might lead to something else.

-Perhaps I never find the time to make my Chapstick dioramas, but maybe a character in one of my books does.

lip balm

I’ve already begun to collect them!

-Maybe I never have a hit music video with my famous actor friends, but I create a video of well choreographed dancing cats that I post to YouTube and use the proceeds to start that animal sanctuary.

cats sleeping

You guys better put your dancing shoes on.

So I say indulge in your daydreams–you never know what might come of it. And to the people who say daydreaming is a waste of time, I say pfft… where’s your story idea for a villainous puppeteer? Or more importantly, where’s your dancing cat video?

Living without a dishwasher (and how to cope with dish-dirtying aversion)

What is wrong with this kitchen? Look closely. Remember I am very lazy and messy. Your first thought might be that the kitchen is actually clean. And yes, that is quite the anomaly. But the real problem is (dun, dun, dun) the lack of a dishwasher.

IMG_1559

I spent twenty minutes cleaning the kitchen just to take this picture … or maybe I just stuffed all the dishes in the oven … hmmmm… Perhaps one day the truth will be revealed.

 

Now I know many people don’t have dishwashers and they can be considered a luxury like fresh air and clean water. But I’ve pretty much had one my whole life and now I’m spoiled. And I’m already a messy person, so not having one just contributes to the ongoing messiness of the house.

See what I mean:

IMG_1548

Maybe I just need more counter space to stack the dishes?

Because of the trauma that comes with seeing so many stacks of glass, porcelain, stoneware and plastic, and the trauma of having to spend minutes upon minutes with my hands immersed in warm water, furiously scrubbing last night’s mashed potatoes from each plate, I’ve developed what is considered a dish-dirtying aversion––I’m afraid of dirtying dishes. Every mug of tea, every bowl of cereal, every slice of pizza that is set on a plate equals (gasp) more time in front of the sink.

At first I tried to think of ways to fix the problem.

1. Not eat. Ha.
2. Use paper plates. Sigh. That would be bad for the environment.
3. Tape a sponge to MoJo the cat’s paw and set him to task. While the thought of making the cats finally earn their keep was enticing, I knew in the end it wouldn’t work. Their arms are too short and their work ethic is poor.

So I’ve developed a few coping strategies to minimize the dish-dirtying, and I will share in hopes of helping others who also suffer from dish-dirtying aversion.

1. I give you the “paper towel plate”

Anything that is stiff and dry works well on a paper towel plate. Think toast, bagels, cookies, crackers. Be warned that the paper towel plate is flimsy compared to the traditional plate and if not handled carefully crumbs can easily spill from the towel to the countertop or floor, thus creating a whole new mess and a potential floor-dirtying aversion.

2. Another solution I’ve used is the “plate repeat”

You see the same plate can be used more than once, especially if the same food item is being eaten each time. For example, when I make my husband a bagel sandwich for breakfast, I just wait for him to finish and then I plop my sandwich on the same plate. Ta da. Two meals, one plate. Your ability to implement this solution will be affected by the timing of meals (do you both want to eat at the same time?), the gooeyness of the meal (sometimes reusing a plate is just icky. Sometimes.) and your tolerance for pet hair (I’m not sure how it happens, but every used plate has at least one cat hair glued to it).

3. This is one of my favorites: “the package is plate”

By definition, “the package is plate” means the packaging that said food product comes in acts as the plate. It works with a can of chili (just dip the spoon right in), an apple pie still in its tin (put the pie on your lap and go to it), and leftovers from last night (just peel back the foil and dig in).

4. And lastly you can create a “mouth burrito”

This is an advanced move and should only be attempted by those who REALLY don’t want to do dishes. First you set out all your ingredients. Then pull off a small piece of tortilla and put it in your mouth, add a pinch of cheese, a spoonful of beans, and a squirt of hot sauce and then chew. Repeat as many times as needed to equal the consumption of a full burrito.

And there you have it. Jennifer Windram’s strategies for living in a non-dishwasher house. Any questions?

Our Holiday Decor Isn’t Perfect, Or Is It?

Last weekend we put up our Christmas décor and finally trimmed our tree. It was a casual affair, pajama pants and sweatshirts, leftovers and soda straight from the can. The guest list included the who’s who of the Maine Windrams: Me, my husband, and all three cats (yes, we got all three to attend).

We began with the décor we bought a few years ago, a time when we were inspired by magazine layouts, catalog ads and Lexus commercials. It was fresh, matching and super sparkly. All the best Target and Hobby Lobby had to offer–we spare no expense at the Windram house.

Matching garland went up above our windows, stuffed Santa’s and Snowmen on tabletops, festive towels in the kitchen.

Then I unpacked the hobby horse. Logan made it when he was eleven or twelve. When I look at it I can’t help but picture him wearing a Guns N’ Roses T-shirt, almost sawing his finger off.

Hobby Horse

One look at this and I knew Logan was destined to be a woodworker.

This, along with some of the other older, non-matching décor used to be displayed in their “own” part of the house, so they didn’t mess with the vibe of the sparkly new items from the big box store. But in our new place, there’s no room for that–it would all have to be displayed together.

Next, I unraveled a wad of newspaper and found these. They belonged to Logan’s grandmother. At first I thought they were angels because of the rings around their heads, but now I think they might be choirboys. Regardless, they come out every year, and while at first I thought they were weird (and they didn’t go with our store bought décor so they were put in the other part of the house), I’ve grown to really like them.

DSC08877

Don’t mind our macaroon shaped heads; baby, we were born this way.

After pausing to sit on the couch and eat half a deep-dish cookie, we trimmed the tree.

During our shopping frenzy a few years ago we also invested in boxes of matching ornaments, shiny new ones that gave our tree that designer, magazine look. Again, the best Target and Hobby Lobby had to offer.

Our older, non-matching, oddball (read lesser) ornaments were relegated to the smaller tree (yes, we have two trees, three actually), where they wouldn’t interfere with the perfection that was the big tree.

But this year, in an effort to keep our moving expenses low (Ha!), we only brought one tree with us. And in a moment of whimsy (I believe brought on by the deep-dish cookie) we decided to hang both the oddball and the perfect ornaments on the same tree.

And it was marvelous.

teddy bear ornament

A brown teddy bear ornament right next to a sparkly blue snowflake. The might even be touching–scandalous!

Moose ornament

A plush moose next to a blue and white, sparkly ornament. These two haven’t reached the touching phase of the relationship, but we’re working on it.

This “ornament” was made last year. I’d forgotten all about it until Logan hung it proudly on our tree.

Ornament fail

I might not be perfectly shaped, but I’m still made of styrofoam and yarn like the other wreaths.

It was supposed to look like this:

wreath ornament

And now as I sit here enjoying our festive décor, I’ve realized it’s the oddball, mismatched items that I like best. They make me smile, remember the past and get all nostalgic. And while our house no longer looks like it could be in a magazine, I think it looks better. And it comes with a partially eaten deep-dish cookie.